Indian culture changed Hinduism by spreading their political and cultural traditions through the southern and southeastern Asia

Indian culture changed Hinduism by spreading their political and cultural traditions through the southern and southeastern Asia. Although India never embarked on a military campaign in the region Indian influenced could be found there. Indian merchants introduced Hinduism, Buddhism, Sanskrit writings and Indian forms of political organization. Muslim Indians established trading communities in the important port cities due to merchant trading. As early as 500 BCE Indian merchants traded on the islands and on the mainland which brought opportunities for the native elites. Indians and natives traded spices and exotic products. Indian merchants brought goods such as textiles, beads, gold, silver, metal goods, and religious products for rituals. Native elites used these profits to organize political control. Native elites became familiar with Indian political and cultural traditions, they used Indian forms of political organizations and also adopted Indian faiths. Kingship became a principle form of political authority and regional kings surrounded themselves with courts. In these courts the administration and rituals were similar to those found in India. Native elites sponsored Hinduism and Buddhism into their courts and sometimes both. They enjoyed literature from India especially those that explained the Buddhist view on the world. The casted system was not popular in this region but they continued to acknowledge the deities and nature spirits. Native elites promoted Hinduism and Buddhism because it supported the principle of monarch rule.