In all the results concluded that attitudes towards transgender people were correlated with endorsement of gender binary beliefs

In all the results concluded that attitudes towards transgender people were correlated with endorsement of gender binary beliefs (Norton & Herek, 2012, p.8). “Transgender attitudes are correlated with the same social psychological variables that have consistently been observed to correlate with heterosexuals” attitudes toward sexual minorities, is what the fourth hypothesis stated” (Norton & Herek, 2012, p.4). This hypothesis looks at four different correlations: authoritarianism, political ideology, religion, and personal contact with sexual minorities of attitudes toward transgender people. I focused on three of the four, political ideology, religion, and personal contact with sexual minorities. 48.2% described their political ideology was moderate, while 26.5% were liberal and 30.7% were conservative (Norton & Herek, 2012, p. 9). The conservative respondents gave lower thermometer rating (25.39%), followed by moderate (32.18%), then liberals (39.23%), thus meaning that conservative individuals had more negative, prejudice attitudes toward transgender people (Norton & Herek, 2012, p.9). The second of the four correlations I focused on was religion. It was found that women who have “a great deal” of religious guidance in their day-to-day living, had transgender ratings that were significantly more negative (Norton & Herek, 2012, p. 9). The results also concluded that prior contact with gay or lesbian people meant that thermometer scores were higher, less prejudice, than respondents who had lacked such contact (Norton & Herek, 2012, p.9). The fifth and last hypothesis that the survey tested was, “men’s attitudes toward both groups are linked I similar ways to the variables specified in hypotheses 3 and 4… If sexual prejudice is controlled, between those variables and men’s transgender attitudes should be reduced to no significance consistent with previous findings.” (Norton & Herek, 2012, p. 4). While hypothesis five had little support, it concluded that heterosexual men’s attitudes toward transgender people and their political and gender beliefs reduced when their attitudes toward gay men were statistically controlled (Norton ; Herek, 2012, p. 110). It also concluded that with ATG scores controlled, women’s attitudes were predicted by “authoritarianism and anti-egalitarianism,” and so were men’s; showing gender differences in the psychological roots of transgender attitudes were not observed (Norton ; Herek, 2012, p.11).

Aaron Norton and Gregory Herek’s article about the attitudes heterosexuals have about transgender people was very interesting, I found that the study focused on some of the main aspects that influence heterosexuals’ attitudes towards transgender people in the U.S. I also gained knowledge about why people may have such attitudes. I feel that the content included throughout this article is very relevant with some of the topics we have discussed in class, such as, ‘ethic, religions, and sexuality’, and gender identity as a whole. The article included many finding that I agree with. One being that, “attitudes towards transgender people were more negative among heterosexual men than heterosexual women” (Norton ; Herek, 2012, p.1). I believe that to be true, statistics prove it, but also though out the community I live in. I have observed the attitudes and stigmatizations transgender people face in my community, and I have witness more negative attitudes coming from the heterosexual men that I have contact with. I also agree that being exposed to more sexual minorities, leads to people having less sexual prejudice toward transgender people. I have found that by having contact with those who identify as lesbian or gay, makes me more accepting of transgender people. I believe that the survey as a whole helps readers gain more knowledge about the prejudice attitudes people, especially heterosexuals, have towards transgender individuals within the Unites States.
The article, “Boys Don’t Cry’ or Do They? Attitudes Toward and Beliefs About Transgender Youth,” by Hogler Elischberger, Jessica Glazier, Eric Hill, and Lynn Baker-Verduzco present a survey study that examines the attitudes U.S. adults have toward transgender children and adolescents. There were 281 individuals (128 male, 152 females, and 1 missing information) that participated in the survey and reported that had “generally favorable attitudes toward transgender minors” (Elischberger, Glazier, Hill, Verduzco, 2016, p. 199). The survey first assesses the attitude adults had toward transgender people by asking a series of questions. It then assesses their behavior intentions with two hypothetical situations. The study concluded with the ‘presumed causes of gender atypicality, where the participants were asked to indicate how strongly biological (nature) and environmental (nurture) cause affect atypical behavior (Elischberger et. al., 2016, p.203).

The article, “Boys Don’t Cry’ or Do They? Attitudes Toward and Beliefs About Transgender Youth,” by Hogler Elischberger, Jessica Glazier, Eric Hill, and Lynn Baker-Verduzco presents a survey study that examines the attitudes U.S. adults have toward transgender children and adolescents. There were 281 individuals (128 male, 152 females, and 1 missing information) that participated in the survey and reported that had “generally favorable attitudes toward transgender minors” (Elischberger, Glazier, Hill, Verduzco, 2016, p. 199). The survey first assesses the attitude adults had toward transgender people by asking a series of questions. It then assesses their behavior intentions with two hypothetical situations. The study concluded with the ‘presumed causes of gender atypicality, where the participants were asked to indicate how strongly biological (nature) and environmental (nurture) cause affect atypical behavior (Elischberger et. al., 2016, p.203).
The survey first assesses the participants attitudes, with a series of attitude statements. The participants used a 10-point Likert type scale ranging from 1, completely disagree, and 10, completely agree to see rate their attitudes toward the list of statements provided. The statements given included “Personally, I view this gender atypical behavior as a problem because …Six of these statements were provided that differed in terms of the reason cited for the disapproval: …it is against my morals, …it contradicts my religious views, B…it will hurt the child’s teenager’s current relationships with their peers, B…it will be a bad influence on other children teenagers,…it may have an effect on the child’s teenager’s sexual orientation …it goes against nature. A seventh option, the child’s behavior is not wrong for any one specific reason, it is just inappropriate” (Elischberger et. al., 2016 p.201). These statements allowed the participants to express their attitudes without giving a specific reason. The attitudes result for this part of the survey, although relatively low, showed that attitudes were less positive in the participants who had religious affiliation, conservative social-political views, and stronger conformity to certain traditional gender norms; however, the endorsement level of participants was highest (7.34 out of 10) with the statement, “I do not find the behavior a problem” (Elischberger et. al., 2016, p. 202). Thus, meaning that the majority of participates did not have a problem with transgender people.