Breana walker 03/22/2018 Wes moore Summary C-veldt

Breana walker
03/22/2018
Wes moore Summary
C-veldt.diestch

The other wes
One of wes good friends woody was graduating from northern high school. For many families
they never thought this day would come but it came, a lot families that were there it was there
first graduation they attended. Wes friend woody was the only one to complete the requirements
to graduate. Woodys other friends such as Wes, White boy, and many others stopped going to
school years earlier. In maryland the graduation rates were some of the highest in the country, in
baltimore city only 38% of students who began high school actually earned their high school
diploma. As woody turned the corner and looked at all the empty chairs where the graduates
were sitting he thought about the ones that weren't there. He thought about daemon, a freshman
classmate who didn't make it to the end of the year. Daemon end up taking a month off of school
to take care of his mother which was sick because of sickle cell. One month turned into two
months then turned to him stop coming at all. Woody thought about white boy, his boy from the
neighborhood, who had started working at a restaurant called poor folks, he was tired of school
he thought working would be a better option. Woody then thought about wes, he stopped going
to school two years earlier. Wes eventually returned to dundee village six months after being
locked up for the incident in which he shot ray. Wes caught a break that night. The first break
was the bullet went through rays shoulder, no organs were hit , ray left the hospital a day later,
wes was charged with attempted murder other than murder. The second break was his case was
sent over to a juvenile court instead of a adult court. Wes lawyer argued he should be tried as a
juvenile because he wouldn't be threat to the community. Wes went back to school immediately
after leaving the juvenile detention center, the baltimore county detention center in towson. Wes
had enrolled himself in lake clifton high school in east baltimore he knew he wouldn't last long.
Wes was two years older than the other kids at the school in his grade. From repeating and losing
time locked up. Teachers classrooms were already over crowded in their classrooms they didn't
have the time to teach wes the basics he had missed. Wes attendance then became shortened ,
and once his first child was born he stopped going . without a highschool diploma or a job and
with a criminal record wes found it hard to find employment to support alicia and the baby.
Alicia was living with the baby in her mother's house while wes stayed with his aunt niecy. Wes
aunt niecy was not for wes child games she told him to either go to school or get a job but for
wes that was not a option for him at all. Wes found a better option he made himself scarce.
While niecy was at work in the morning, wes would play video games lounge around the house
and then head out to check on his drug operation. When she was home in the evenings wes
would usually be out then eventually come back telling niecy he's been out looking for a job the
lie went on for months . wes wasn't at the house often he just used the home to rest and to hide

his drugs. Wes had a whole drug operation lined up with the precision of a military unit or
division of a fortune 500 company. The drug game had its own rules, its own structure. Wes was
the leader of his drug crew. Everyone had specific duties to do. On the lowest rung ladder and in
most cases the youngest kids on the team was the corner boys.

Author wes
Wes had been at Valley Forge for three years, and had transformed from one of the most
disruptive students to one of the most respected. He was a platoon sergeant, cadet master
sergeant, and the youngest senior noncommissioned officer in the entire corps. He had finally
learned how to respect himself and others. Wes was not only committed to better himself
personally, but academically and athletically. The financial burden military school had placed on
his mother was lessened in his second year when he began receiving academic and athletic
scholarships. He was the only sophomore starter on the basketball team, and colleges and
universities had started taking notice of his skills. He spent his summers at basketball camps,
speaking with coaches and other prospects. Despite his obvious talent, his family warned him to
keep thinking about college. His uncle lectured him about always having a back-up plan, and
how education could help him in that. Though he wanted to keep dreaming of the NBA, the talk
with his uncle and a letter from his old friend Justin brought things into perspective. Justin
informed him that their friend Shea had been arrested on serious drug charges and was going to
prison. Justin also shared that his mother was dying, which made Wes question his environment.
Even though he enjoyed military school now, it upset him that he was unable to be a support for
his friends and family. He felt like military school was a “bubble” that had been his protection
from the problems in the world he grew up in. This idea was further solidified for Wes when he
experienced racism and violence in the town by the school. As he Dalio, a fellow platoon
sergeant, walked to a local pizza parlor, they began to get harassed by a car of drunken kids.
Though Wes and Dalio tried to ignore and avoid them, the group shouted a racial slur at Wes and
threw a bottle at him. The bottom hit him in the mouth, breaking one of his front teeth and
cutting his gum. “My mouth was aching. I was beside myself with anger – and still confused and
embarrassed. Embarrassed to be called a nigger in front of my comrade. And embarrassed by my
reaction. Because after being called a nigger and having my tooth broken, I’d decided to flee
back to campus. Should I have stayed there in the middle of the street, waiting for the boys to
come back, somehow gotten them out of their car, and tested them blow for blow? Part of me
was aghast when I decided that the answer was no.” His instincts were to fight back but he had
learned in the past few years that the odds were not in his favor. He chose to lead his fellow
platoon sergeant back to school through a safer route, away from the street. Though Dalio did not
know where they were, Wes did. “The irony of the situation forced me to smile, featuring my
newly cracked tooth. Years earlier, I had run through these same woods with all of my might,
looking for safety, trying to get away from campus. Tonight, I ran through the same woods
looking for safety, but in the other direction.”